Since Los Angeles doesn’t give us any snow to play in, I decided to throw together a little snowman kit to send off to my nephew so that he could build one for me!

I included: a scarf, 4 extra large buttons, plastic carrotcorncob pipe, and two pieces of coal. I found a large box at a local party supply store and wrapped it all up with a thick red ribbon. It’s an easy gift for any little ones (and big!) in your life!

DIY: Clocks with Pop!
I found these little clocks the other day at Ikea for just 99¢ each. I grabbed a couple with the idea that I could probably do something with them.  I decided I would create each clock in a different timezone: California because that’s where I live (duh), New York for East coast time and Utah because that’s where I’m from. 
Using a small screwdriver (the kind you’d use to fix eyeglasses), I took apart the whole clock. It was really simple: 6 screws total. I taped off a small design with some painters tape and used acrylic paint to add a bold pop of color to each clock. I had a few issues with the paint peeling up when I took off the tape so I’d recommend using spray paint or paint pens if you have them. If you do end up using acrylic paint, just make sure to peel up the tape before it’s fully dry and you should be fine. 
I used the clock face that the clock originally came with as a template to create a custom face on my computer. Last step is to put the clock back together — again, really easy. And there ya go! 
Download the template that I made here. 

DIY: Clocks with Pop!

I found these little clocks the other day at Ikea for just 99¢ each. I grabbed a couple with the idea that I could probably do something with them.  I decided I would create each clock in a different timezone: California because that’s where I live (duh), New York for East coast time and Utah because that’s where I’m from. 

Using a small screwdriver (the kind you’d use to fix eyeglasses), I took apart the whole clock. It was really simple: 6 screws total. I taped off a small design with some painters tape and used acrylic paint to add a bold pop of color to each clock. I had a few issues with the paint peeling up when I took off the tape so I’d recommend using spray paint or paint pens if you have them. If you do end up using acrylic paint, just make sure to peel up the tape before it’s fully dry and you should be fine. 

I used the clock face that the clock originally came with as a template to create a custom face on my computer. Last step is to put the clock back together — again, really easy. And there ya go! 

Download the template that I made here. 

Freezer Paper Stenciling: This is such a quick and easy alternative to screen printing when you want to make a simple one of a kind piece. Works great on t-shirts, pillowcases, bags, etc. 
Supplies:
Fabric 
Freezer Paper (found near the saran wrap in the grocery store)
Fabric Paint
Iron
Exacto Knife
Foam Paint Brush
Cardboard
Directions:
Draw your design on your freezer paper with the shiny side down and then cut it out with your exacto knife. Then place your freezer paper stencil on your fabric in the desired location. After you’ve placed your art, with the shiny side down, iron the freezer paper with medium heat. I went over mine several times so that I made sure it was secure. Pay attention to the edges. 
Now that the paper is secure, it’s time to paint. When I painted the heart, I made sure to pull the brush in from the edge to the center so that it didn’t push any paint under the freezer paper. Once everything is covered, let it set for an hour and then pull off the paper. Check your paint instructions as they may vary, but mine took about 4 hours to fully be set.  I did the same design on a tshirt and washed it inside out the next day and it turned out great! 

Freezer Paper Stenciling: This is such a quick and easy alternative to screen printing when you want to make a simple one of a kind piece. Works great on t-shirts, pillowcases, bags, etc. 

Supplies:

Fabric 

Freezer Paper (found near the saran wrap in the grocery store)

Fabric Paint

Iron

Exacto Knife

Foam Paint Brush

Cardboard

Directions:

Draw your design on your freezer paper with the shiny side down and then cut it out with your exacto knife. Then place your freezer paper stencil on your fabric in the desired location. After you’ve placed your art, with the shiny side down, iron the freezer paper with medium heat. I went over mine several times so that I made sure it was secure. Pay attention to the edges. 

Now that the paper is secure, it’s time to paint. When I painted the heart, I made sure to pull the brush in from the edge to the center so that it didn’t push any paint under the freezer paper. Once everything is covered, let it set for an hour and then pull off the paper. Check your paint instructions as they may vary, but mine took about 4 hours to fully be set.  I did the same design on a tshirt and washed it inside out the next day and it turned out great! 

As I’ve been settling into my new apartment, I’ve been realizing how bare the walls are. I’m completely determined to bring some color to my gray walls. Inspired by this Spectrum Mobile at the MOMA, I set to work to recreate a version for myself. 
It cost under $4.00 total and took about 10 minutes to sew each strand. I love walking by and seeing them spinning around!

As I’ve been settling into my new apartment, I’ve been realizing how bare the walls are. I’m completely determined to bring some color to my gray walls. Inspired by this Spectrum Mobile at the MOMA, I set to work to recreate a version for myself. 

It cost under $4.00 total and took about 10 minutes to sew each strand. I love walking by and seeing them spinning around!